Fountain of youth

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Ok, ok, so maybe it’s not the actual “fountain of youth”, but recent research has highlighted that daily sunscreen use can slow the signs of aging. For reals. The recent Annals of Internal Medicine study demonstrated that study participants (adults younger than 55) who used sunscreen daily showed no detectable increase in skin aging after 4.5 years. As another plug for daily sunscreen use, the study showed that skin aging from baseline to the end of the trial was 24% less in the daily sunscreen group compared to a group of adults using sunscreen at their discretion. As with most data, additional research should be done to further investigate results, but in the meantime if you are looking to maintain those youthful good looks, try adding sunscreen or moisturizer with sunscreen into your daily routine and make it a habit.
See you in the shade!

Sticks and stones….

photo credit: lyceum group

photo credit: lyceum group

Most of you know how this saying goes, but I’ve added my own spin on it so I’m giving it a whirl:

Sticks and stones may break your bones

But Sunburns can really hurt you!

For those of you who are willing to entertain my version of nursery rhymes, thank you because I’ve taken liberties to take it one step further…

I’m rubber and you’re glue

I hope what I tell you about sun safety, skin cancer and melanoma bounces off me and sticks to you!

I know what you are probably thinking. That’s so juvenile right? Maybe Dr. Barr washed down some goldfish with too many glasses of red wine. Could she be more childish?

But that is the whole point of this post…children. Your children, my children and children all over the world. Anyone with a relationship with a child (could be your best friends’ child, a niece/nephew or your own)  has experienced that undeniable instinct to protect them from harm. It doesn’t matter what form the threat of harm may take, whether it be psychological or physical, we as adults, put on our proverbial armor and prepare ourselves to defeat the perpetrator to a child’s well-being.  Somewhere along the way however, our armor got a chink in it and we have failed to adequately protect our children (let alone ourselves) from the damaging effects of the sun. Research recently presented at the American Association of Cancer Research meeting confirms our shortcomings. Although the incidence of melanoma in childhood is rare, statistics show that the frequency of children and adolescents diagnosed with melanoma is on the rise.

Data pooled from numerous U.S. cancer registries highlighted that the incidence of childhood and adolescent melanoma has increased an average of 2 percent per year spanning the time period from 1973 to 2009. Of note, girls had higher incidence rates than boys, and compared to younger children so did those aged 15-19. Similar to their adult counterparts, girls had higher rates on their lower limbs and hips, while boys had higher incidence on the face and trunk. While further research needs to be performed to determine the factors contributing to the rising incidence, we don’t have to wait for additional data to be pro-active about vigilant protection of children and adolescents from the damaging effects of UV radiation.

Wearing wide-brimmed hats, sunscreen (with re-application at least every 2 hours) and wearing UPF rated clothing (30 and above) coupled with modifying hours spent outdoors to avoid high intensity UV-radiation (currently recommended between 10a-4p but that may be hard to do, so doing your best to avoid 12-3p may be easier) are crucial steps in protecting children and adolescents more delicate skin. But that’s only part of the solution.

Artificial UV radiation sources found at tanning salons are a significant contributing factor as I touched on in my What’s the big deal post. UV radiation from tanning devices are a significant contributor to the rising rates of both non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancer.

We know that Ultraviolet A (UVA) and Ultraviolet B(UVB) rays contribute to the development of skin cancer of all types. UVB is primarily responsible for contributing to sunburns. UVA rays penetrate deeper into the skin and contribute to premature aging of the skin including: alterations in pigmentation (brown spots), fine lines, wrinkles and loss of elasticity that contributes to a leathery appearance. Together, the synergistic effect of UVA and UVB rays contribute to the development of skin cancer. Of note, an Australian-US study has demonstrated that UVA causes more genetic damage than UVB in skin cells where most skin cancers arise – the keratinocytes in the basal layer of the epidermis. This information is critical as most tanning devices emit UVA radiation.
So what’s the bottom line you ask? It’s pretty simple: don’t let kids go to tanning salons and practice sun-safe behavior every day. Being sun-safe doesn’t mean you have to stay indoors, rather it’s a lifestyle choice. Choosing clothing that protects a greater proportion of your skin, altering the times of day you pursue your outdoor activities and putting on sunscreen as part of your daily personal hygiene regimen can easily be incorporated into your daily routine.

So how does this nursery rhyme end? Here goes:
Sticks and stones can break your bones
But Sunburns can’t hurt you if you are sun-savvy!
Doesn’t rhyme but I never said I was Dr. Seuss. Cheers to finding your Shaded Bliss!

References:
1. Skin cancer foundation: skincancer.org
2. Pediatrics Vol. 131 No. 4 April 1, 2013 pp. 772 -785

What’s the big deal?

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Skin cancer is a big deal. More than 3.5 million cases of nonmelanoma skin cancer in over two million people and over 70,000 cases of melanoma are reported each year, which makes skin cancer the most commonly diagnosed cancer the United States. This means that on an annual basis there are more new cases of skin cancer than the incidence of cancers of the breast, prostate, lung and colon combined. To break this down further, one in five Americans (one in three Caucasians) will develop skin cancer during the course of a lifetime. Bottom line…skin cancer is a big deal. In my skin cancer and sun safety basics post I go over a lot of the facts, so please refer back to it for a more in-depth discussion, and please feel free to reach out if you have any questions. Also check out skincancer.org for a wealth of great information and photos of all of the different types of skin cancers.

So if I already talked about these facts in a previous post, why am I all riled up and repeating myself you might ask? Contrary to what my kids may say (and my husband and possibly the neighbors, but who likes nosy neighbors anyway?) I have not lost my mind, but my mind is most certainly boggled. A recent study reported that greater than 27% of melanoma survivors never put on sunscreen when spending more than an hour in the sun. Researchers at Yale also found that 15.4% of skin cancer survivors rarely or never sought shade from the sun, and 2.1% used tanning beds. This is insanity. Tanning beds? Evidence from several studies has shown that exposure to UV radiation from indoor tanning beds is linked with an increased risk of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, and non-melanoma skin cancer. In fact, studies have demonstrated a 75 percent increase in the risk of melanoma in those who have been exposed to UV radiation from indoor tanning. 75 percent! This evidence is the basis for championing the passage of legislation to ban the use of tanning beds for minors (currently 33 states have restricted teen’s access to tanning beds). So if these are the facts, and people who have already been diagnosed with skin cancer have been educated about these facts, and believe me, as dermatologists we tell our patients, over and over again, then why are skin cancer patients still ignoring them? This is a dilemma. This is my dilemma and I want to help change these statistics. But I need your help to do it.

We know that protecting your skin from the damaging UVA and UVB rays of the sun is imperative to minimizing your risk of developing skin cancer. Sun protection is a multi-faceted process: practicing sun avoidance during the hottest parts of the day, seeking shade (I promise you can find bliss there), wearing sunscreen (daily and reapplying often) and wearing clothing that has a UPF rating greater than 30, are all important to keeping you safe in the sun.

Based on the staggering number of skin cancers diagnosed annually and the results of the recent study noted above, it would appear that telling people this information isn’t enough. It would appear that a cultural shift, a “shade revolution” if you will, is in order. For starters, we need to embrace vintage times, go retro…what’s old is new again. It works for current fashion trends (hello neon and leg warmers!) and toys (yes, cabbage patch kids I’m talking about you!) so why can’t we embrace the way we used to behave in the sun. Back in the day our ancestors spent plenty of time outdoors, but clothing protected the majority of their body. Being pale was in vogue, whereas having a tan was undesirable. We can do this! You don’t have to give up that Caribbean vacation or frolic on the beach, just be sun savvy! Tap into your sun-conscious and take the necessary steps to protect your skin. Together we can change the perception of what’s “hot” in the sun and you will find your shaded bliss, I promise!