Sticks and stones….

photo credit: lyceum group

photo credit: lyceum group

Most of you know how this saying goes, but I’ve added my own spin on it so I’m giving it a whirl:

Sticks and stones may break your bones

But Sunburns can really hurt you!

For those of you who are willing to entertain my version of nursery rhymes, thank you because I’ve taken liberties to take it one step further…

I’m rubber and you’re glue

I hope what I tell you about sun safety, skin cancer and melanoma bounces off me and sticks to you!

I know what you are probably thinking. That’s so juvenile right? Maybe Dr. Barr washed down some goldfish with too many glasses of red wine. Could she be more childish?

But that is the whole point of this post…children. Your children, my children and children all over the world. Anyone with a relationship with a child (could be your best friends’ child, a niece/nephew or your own)  has experienced that undeniable instinct to protect them from harm. It doesn’t matter what form the threat of harm may take, whether it be psychological or physical, we as adults, put on our proverbial armor and prepare ourselves to defeat the perpetrator to a child’s well-being.  Somewhere along the way however, our armor got a chink in it and we have failed to adequately protect our children (let alone ourselves) from the damaging effects of the sun. Research recently presented at the American Association of Cancer Research meeting confirms our shortcomings. Although the incidence of melanoma in childhood is rare, statistics show that the frequency of children and adolescents diagnosed with melanoma is on the rise.

Data pooled from numerous U.S. cancer registries highlighted that the incidence of childhood and adolescent melanoma has increased an average of 2 percent per year spanning the time period from 1973 to 2009. Of note, girls had higher incidence rates than boys, and compared to younger children so did those aged 15-19. Similar to their adult counterparts, girls had higher rates on their lower limbs and hips, while boys had higher incidence on the face and trunk. While further research needs to be performed to determine the factors contributing to the rising incidence, we don’t have to wait for additional data to be pro-active about vigilant protection of children and adolescents from the damaging effects of UV radiation.

Wearing wide-brimmed hats, sunscreen (with re-application at least every 2 hours) and wearing UPF rated clothing (30 and above) coupled with modifying hours spent outdoors to avoid high intensity UV-radiation (currently recommended between 10a-4p but that may be hard to do, so doing your best to avoid 12-3p may be easier) are crucial steps in protecting children and adolescents more delicate skin. But that’s only part of the solution.

Artificial UV radiation sources found at tanning salons are a significant contributing factor as I touched on in my What’s the big deal post. UV radiation from tanning devices are a significant contributor to the rising rates of both non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancer.

We know that Ultraviolet A (UVA) and Ultraviolet B(UVB) rays contribute to the development of skin cancer of all types. UVB is primarily responsible for contributing to sunburns. UVA rays penetrate deeper into the skin and contribute to premature aging of the skin including: alterations in pigmentation (brown spots), fine lines, wrinkles and loss of elasticity that contributes to a leathery appearance. Together, the synergistic effect of UVA and UVB rays contribute to the development of skin cancer. Of note, an Australian-US study has demonstrated that UVA causes more genetic damage than UVB in skin cells where most skin cancers arise – the keratinocytes in the basal layer of the epidermis. This information is critical as most tanning devices emit UVA radiation.
So what’s the bottom line you ask? It’s pretty simple: don’t let kids go to tanning salons and practice sun-safe behavior every day. Being sun-safe doesn’t mean you have to stay indoors, rather it’s a lifestyle choice. Choosing clothing that protects a greater proportion of your skin, altering the times of day you pursue your outdoor activities and putting on sunscreen as part of your daily personal hygiene regimen can easily be incorporated into your daily routine.

So how does this nursery rhyme end? Here goes:
Sticks and stones can break your bones
But Sunburns can’t hurt you if you are sun-savvy!
Doesn’t rhyme but I never said I was Dr. Seuss. Cheers to finding your Shaded Bliss!

References:
1. Skin cancer foundation: skincancer.org
2. Pediatrics Vol. 131 No. 4 April 1, 2013 pp. 772 -785

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